Author: Gabrielle Schock

Teaching with Technology: 2 Tools to Increase Engagement and Success

Author: Eugene Matthews, Ph.D., Park University  Tool #1: ZipGrade An Inexpensive, but Effective App ZipGrade is one of two mobile applications I use consistently to reduce my grading time by at least 90%, evaluate my teaching and student knowledge, reduce student anxiety and enhance student success. Here’s how I make it work for me. As the name implies, ZipGrade is a simple and inexpensive mobile application (approx. $15.00 annually) which lives in the cloud and works through my smartphone. It uses Creative Commons downloadable Scantron-style question sheets (20, 50, 100), which I add to my quizzes and exams. After Read More…


Innovators Speak: Creating a Co-Requisite Model for English Composition

Author: Greg Underwood, English Department Chair at Pearl River Community College As a chair, I helped oversee the Pearl River Community College English department’s shift from offering nine non-transferrable developmental hours before students could enroll in the traditional first semester writing course, to a track where those same students now directly enroll in a transferrable, four-credit hour first semester writing course. We’re now in our second year, and our tracking numbers show that academically, students perform at or above the levels they did previously. Combined with the fewer developmental hours students no longer have to take, we now retain more Read More…


Innovators Speak: Advice I Wish I Had While Considering, Planning and Designing our English Co-Requisite Model

Author: Dr. Jenny Billings, Chair of English and Study Skills at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and Cengage Faculty Partner A year ago, I attended a state-wide meeting about changes coming to North Carolina Community Colleges: Developmental English was going to be redesigned, again. Rather than panic, pretend like it was going to go away, or wait around, I volunteered my department, my college, to be the first to pilot the proposed changes. I figured that if we were the first to pilot, we could help inform the System Office and possibly influence the decisions made. Plus, this is a good Read More…


5 Tips to Engage Your Introduction to Business Students

  Want to capture the attention of your Introduction to Business students? Check out the following five tips to engage your students and increase success in class — and beyond. Tip 1: Make Content Applicable to Students’ Daily Lives Incorporating hot topics in business from Amazon, to AI, to the #MeToo movement, helps students relate course concepts to their everyday lives.  The Cengage Higher Ed Faculty Community provides articles related to discipline content that you can bring in for classroom discussion.  From reviewing new branding strategies in Marketing Dunkin’ to learning about the Worst Read More…


9 Management Myths, Debunked!

As an instructor, you want your students to gain the skills needed to think and act like successful managers. Unfortunately, it’s easy for new managers to fall for the many myths about what good managers do. Check out these nine management myths, plus discover ways to help your students navigate the management world. MANAGEMENT MYTH #1: There’s only one right way to lead or manage. THE TRUTH: Leadership can be customized for different employees. Hersey and Blanchard argue employees have different levels of readiness for handling different jobs, responsibilities and work assignments. Accordingly, Hersey and Blanchard’s situational theory states that leaders need Read More…


Increasing Engagement with Digital Resources

Author:  Dr. Stephanie Thomas, Cornell University How do you engage a class of more than 450 students with varying academic backgrounds and vastly different interests in the subject? This is the challenge I face every fall semester when I offer Introductory Microeconomics. I approach this question from the following perspective: students come to class on the first day because they have to come. They come to class the rest of the semester because they want to come. It’s hard for us to imagine why a student wouldn’t want to come to class! As instructors, most of us enjoyed going to Read More…


Summer 2018 AIR Newsletter

The following articles are featured in the Summer 2018 issue of Accounting Instructor’s Report. Enjoy!         TRENDS & TOPICS  The Relationship between Accounting Students’ Personality, Professional Skepticism and Anticipatory Socialization Belverd E. Needles, Jr., Ph.D., CPA, CMA Editor, Accounting Instructors’ Report (AIR), DePaul University   Creating a Rubric with Specific Tasks: an Effective Strategy for Beginning Accounting Projects Michael J. Krause MS, CPA (NY & IN), Professor Emeritus, Le Moyne College   Balanced and Efficient Summative Peer Evaluation In Group Work in Accounting Education Tom Downen & Steven Leerberg, University of North Carolina Wilmington    A Common-Sense Approach to Teaching Cost Variances: No Cheat Sheets Required Margaret N. Read More…


Knocking Out Student Misunderstandings On Applying Manufacturing Overhead

Authors:

James M Emig, PhD, CPA, Villanova University Robert P Derstine, PhD, CPA, West Chester University Thomas J Grant, Sr., M.B.A., CMA, Kutztown University Many schools schedule managerial accounting after students have completed the financial accounting course. For those students not exactly enamored with their experience in financial accounting, imagine their ‘delight’ in now being forced to take your managerial accounting course. It can be a struggle to get those students to do little more than ‘memorize’ and be satisfied with just surviving the course. Using our combined 125+ years of teaching experience, we have developed ‘tricks and techniques’ to make Read More…


A Common Sense Approach to Teaching Cost Variances: No Cheat Sheets Required

Author:

Margaret N. Boldt, Ph.D., CMA, College of Business, Southeastern Louisiana University This paper presents an alternative way of presenting cost variance calculations that helps students correctly solve typical cost variance problems and focus on the size of the variances rather than the labels of ‘favorable’ and ‘unfavorable’. This method uses three modifications to traditional methods of instruction to avoid some common pitfalls that may lead students to incorrectly perceive unfavorable variances as negative and needing attention while favorable variances are positive and do not need attention. The three suggested modifications to traditional instruction are easily implemented with any existing course Read More…


Balanced and Efficient Summative Peer Evaluation In Group Work in Accounting Education

Authors:

Tom Downen Assistant Professor of Accounting & Steven Leerberg, Graduate Student (alumnus), Cameron School of Business, University of North Carolina Wilmington  As more university courses include group work, the need for student peer evaluation (SPE) grows ever stronger. In fact, students seem to have developed an expectation for group work and for a requirement or opportunity to evaluate their peers. A variety of SPE tools are used, often with different attributes (point scales, elements of evaluation, etc.) These different SPE tools often have varying application in different courses and for different collaborative tasks. This paper presents a brief summary of Read More…