Author: Heather Mooney

Being Mindful of Your Social Media History

As we’ve discussed this week, social media can be leveraged to engage students and expand your own social network. However, many of us also use it for personal reasons, and the line between personal and professional can begin to fade. There is a certain level of privacy lost by displaying personal information online, and it’s important to be mindful of the history you’re leaving behind as you post. This can be particularly important for job seekers and for your students who are starting their quest for employment. In New Perspectives: Portfolio Projects for Soft Skills, author Beverly Read More…


Social Networking: Think Before Posting—or Deleting

Social media and social networking can present great opportunities for both you and your students to engage and connect with each other and with the world around you. However, online interactions like these can also leave posters open to criticism. It’s important to consider how you’ll react to these situations. Do you delete the comment or post to avoid offending anyone? Do you take the opportunity, if appropriate, to start a meaningful dialogue around the subject? The activity below, from the instructor’s manual that accompanies Louis E. Boone and David L. Kurtz’s Contemporary Marketing, 16th Editioncan be used Read More…


We’re Awarding a $2500 Scholarship for a Slice of Life

We frequently write about ways to reach your students–whether through active learning, flipping the classroom, or trying new technologies–and the basis for all of it is to promote student engagement to reach improved outcomes. As someone who works daily to engage students in what they’re learning, you know that they come to your classroom with unique traits and identities. We want to hear about them! There’s “more than one way to peel an orange,” and there’s more than one way to learn. We’re asking students to get creative and make a short video that Read More…


Social Networking as a Solution, Not a Distraction

If you are thinking about using social media in your classroom, before you even set up an account, have a goal in mind. Successful and productive social media activity can be a solution to a problem. Do you want to have more connection with the students in your classes? Google+ could help you do that. Are you looking to get timely information specific to your course subject matter from relevant sources? Twitter could be a good option. Or are you just trying to get students more engaged in class by having them use visuals? Read More…


Fun and Learning for Students of Any Age

Games are not just for teaching our youngest learners important skills. In fact, they can be valuable tools for engaging students of any age in course content. In this video, authors Dan Petrak and Maria Andersen discuss how they developed math apps specifically with adult and young adult learners in mind. Based on their understanding of their students’ needs, they worked to create games that encourage persistence and engagement, deter boredom and frustration, and make practice fun in an age-appropriate manner.   Have you created or used a game to engage your students? What factors helped you determine its effectiveness or Read More…


Playing to Learn: Tales from the Trenches

Guest Contributor: Jeannie Novak, Lead Author & Series Editor, Game Development Essentials. In 2003, while speaking at the University of Southern California’s Teaching, Learning & Technology conference, I noticed more than a few visibly uncomfortable educators in the audience. I had recently completed my Master’s thesis on using massively multiplayer online games (MMOs) as online distance learning applications, and I was providing a summary of my findings. The notion of any game posing as a learning management system (LMS) was difficult enough for most to parse—especially at the time—but those who weren’t well versed in the workings of Read More…


Course Redesign: History, Success, and Recommendations

Guest Contributor: Elaine Gray, Appalachian State University. A Little History The National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT) has gathered more than a decade’s worth of evidence and enthusiasm for what Peter Ewell, Vice President, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, describes as “the most extensive demonstration to date of the effectiveness of fusing instructional technology and reconceptualized instructional practices.” The course redesign movement is credited with bringing about increased retention, high quality learning, and cost savings to higher education institutions. NCAT’s monograph Increasing Success for Underserved Students: Redesigning Introductory Courses provides a comprehensive overview of case studies from thirty colleges and universities Read More…


Addressing Interdisciplinary Digital Literacy

What does “digital literacy” mean to students as it applies to your courses? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below. As we’ve discussed previously on the blog, digital literacy is an essential tool for preparing students for their future workplaces. When you teach students how to be digitally literate, you’re not only instilling important technical skills, but also an understanding of appropriate use of that technology. But being digitally literate doesn’t mean the same thing to everyone. Depending on a student’s field of study, his or her needs in understanding certain technology skills could Read More…


Learning from Fellow Students: Creating a Study Group

Do you encourage students to form study groups to learn from one another outside of class? What have you seen work best in these peer learning circles to facilitate progress? Share with us in the comments section below. We’ve written about the benefits of peer-to-peer learning before, but learning from fellow students can extend beyond course assignments–the benefits of working with peers certainly does. In On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life, Skip Downing describes how starting a study group can encourage students to be more invested in course content by interacting more Read More…


Engaging Today’s Changing Learners

In this video, author Jeff Butterfield talks about the changing demographic of today’s learners, and what that means to the teaching and learning experience. He also gives his advice for engaging your learners by changing the way you may be used to doing things and by always asking yourself: Are there are new ways that I could be reaching my students? How have you seen the student demographic in your classroom shift over the years? Share your thoughts on how your students have changed (or not!) in the comments section below.  [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xsou8iTDWLQ?wmode=Opaque] Jeff Butterfield holds a Ph.D. from the University Read More…