Author: Tami Strang

Creating a “Lecture Map” that Facilitates Active Listening

A lecture may be crafted with consistency and clarity, but sometimes an audience—especially one unfamiliar with your topic—needs some help to follow your train of thought. In Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lectern, Constance Staley offers some suggestions for building a helpful “lecture map” that orients listeners to your message’s key concepts. Download a helpful active-listening activitythat will hlep students build these skills. Reference: Content adapted from Staley, Constance. 2003. Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lectern. Belmont: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. Do you have additional thoughts, ideas, or suggestions on this topic? Please share your comments below.     Read More…


What Do You Mean, Active Learning?

Active learning can conjure images of getting up and doing jumping jacks in classroom aisles. For many of us, escaping the grips of high school gym class never came soon enough and it’s probably not something we’d like to revisit. Never fear. When we talk about active learning, we aren’t being that literal. But what is active learning, and why is it important in today’s classroom? In Fifty Ways to Leave Your Lectern, Constance Staley writes that today’s teachers are encouraged to take a more facilitative role in the learning experience – an approach that she writes “Requires a Read More…


Steps for Maintaining a Healthy Attitude

In her book FOCUS on College Success, Constance Staley offers students eight tips that can bolster their attitudes and set them on a path towards positive personal achievement. Perhaps a few of these suggestions will give you some encouragement as well! Know that you always have choices. Regardless of circumstances, you always have a choice, even if it’s limited to how you choose to perceive your current situation.
Take responsibility for your own outcomes. Blaming others simply reduces your own power to work toward constructive responses to challenges.
Convert turning points into learning points. Instead of beating yourself up when things don’t go well, figure Read More…


Identifying – and Managing – Students’ Expectations

When students enter your classroom or library for the first time, they bring with them their concerns about their future experiences, as well as their high hopes for positive outcomes. Though some of their preconceptions may be based on projection, rumors, or sheer nervousness, taking the time to know and understand the motivation behind students’ expectations can set the tone for an engaging and productive experience. Rather than try to guess what students are thinking, you may decide to devote some time to a question-and-answer session during your first meeting. In addition to learning more about the students, you’ll Read More…