Author: Talia Wise

Tackling the Time Conundrum

As an instructor, you may wonder: how do I proactively manage my time in a way that ensures I accomplish the goals I’ve established for myself, as well as those goals and expectations established by my institution? And, how do I use classroom time to its fullest advantage, while simultaneously encouraging students to do likewise? In a recent webinar, Jeff Schillinger of Harrison College presents a number of practical strategies that you can use to maximize the time you spend with students in class, as well as the time you invest in supporting students outside of your regular classroom Read More…


Best of the Blog: Crafting Engaging and Successful Lectures

As we wrap up this “Best-Of” series at the Cengage Learning Blog, we’re highlighting an article that addresses one of the soft skills that can greatly enhance your effectiveness as an instructor: your presentation style. In this popular post, Bridgett McGowen-Hawkins shows you how to “Say ‘Goodbye’ to the Boring Lecture.” Read on, and you’ll gather her top tips for lectures and presentations that engage students in the material you’re striving to communicate to them. Want more? Read the following posts, packed with suggestions for enhancing your professional and personal skills:

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Using Mobile Technology in the Classroom and Beyond

Chances are, if you’re reading this post on your computer or on a handheld device, you have some familiarity with online technology and feel comfortable with it. Hopefully, you’re the kind of instructor who is open and eager to utilize the growing list of free and fabulous websites and apps that are readily available to you and your students—resources that drive collaboration, organization, and even fun. At Cengage Learning’s 18th Annual Course Technology Conference, Professor Gina Bowes-Miller of Harrisburg Area Community College presented Using Mobile Technology in the Classroom and Beyond. In the video below, you can learn how Professor Bowers-Miller has used Read More…


Digitally Literate Student Engagement

With online education making headline news due to Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC’s) from MIT, Stanford, and other prominent institutions, many colleges are wondering where they fit in the online education movement. Technology courses such as the Intro to Computers course are ideal courses to teach 100% online, and provide a great start for schools looking to extend their reach beyond the local community. When delivered effectively, online courses can also ignite learning in iGeneration students who live a great portion of their lives online. For example: In 1998, Professor Ken Baldauf joined the Florida State University (FSU) faculty Read More…


Do Violent Video Games Increase Aggression?

Contributor: Brad J. Bushman, PhD, co-author (with Roy F. Baumeister) of Social Psychology and Human Nature, Third Edition, available in Comprehensive and Brief versions.   In 1972, the Surgeon General issued the following warning on violent TV programs: “It is clear to me that the causal relationship between televised violence and antisocial behavior is sufficient to warrant appropriate and immediate remedial action. … There comes a time when the data are sufficient to justify action. That time has come.”” (Steinfeld, 1972). That was over 4 decades ago! In the years since this Surgeon General warning was issued, hundreds Read More…


How is Parenting a Challenging Child Like Trying to Lose Weight?

Contributor: V. Mark Durand, co-author of Essentials of Abnormal Psychology, 6th Edition and Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach, 6th Edition (both with David H. Barlow). After decades of research and millions of dollars spent on diets we now know the secret to losing weight – eat fewer calories and move more! Not exactly a major new headline, yet millions still struggle with this simple strategy. Why? Because our thoughts and emotions get in the way of making better choices (e.g., eating healthier foods, getting more exercise). Anxiety can cause you to lose your willpower and eat Read More…


Over the Top: When One’s Influence Goes to One’s Head (and Beyond)

Contributor: Dana S. Dunn, PhD, author of Assessing Teaching and Learning in Psychology: Current and Future Perspectives, 1st Edition as well as ADJUST and Psychology Applied to Modern Life: Adjustment in the 21st Century, 10th Edition (with Wayne Weiten and Elizabeth Yost Hammer).   Part of psychology’s mission is to demystify and explain where or why people’s daily perceptions get them into trouble sometimes. Consider some well-known findings from social psychology on how we look. Attractive people, for example, get away with a lot more than less attractive people; we attribute all kinds of favorable qualities (e.g., wit, intelligence, skill) to those Read More…


Are Letters of Recommendation Worth the Effort?

Contributor: Michael G. Aamodt, PhD., author of Industrial/Organizational Psychology: An Applied Approach, 7th Edition. This time of year, faculty are often busy writing letters of recommendation for students applying to graduate school and responding to reference requests from potential employers. Considering the amount of time and effort spent writing letters, completing reference forms, and providing phone references, it makes sense to ask whether letters of recommendation actually predict student or employee performance. Given that one of the basic beliefs in psychology is that the best predictor of future performance is past performance, one would think that references would Read More…


The Artist: A Case Study in Culture and Emotion

Contributor: Dr. David Matsumoto. Last year The Artist won for Best Movie at the Academy Awards. It’s a French romantic comedy drama in the style of a black-and-white silent film. It is directed by Michel Hazanavicius, and stars Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo. The story takes place in Hollywood, between 1927 and 1932, and focuses on the relationship of an older silent film star (George Valentin, played by Dujardin) and a rising young actress (Peppy Miller, played by Bejo), as silent cinema falls out of fashion and is replaced by the talkies. Admittedly, I did not see the film before Read More…


How Psychology Has Developed as a Science

John Cacioppo, author of Discovering Psychology: The Science of the Mind, First Edition, discusses his research on how psychology has developed as a science over the years. He talks about the shift from antagonism between the social and biological approaches to accepting that diverse perspectives give us a more complete understanding of how the mind works. Listen to hear how psychology has emerged as one of the seven hub sciences, and how scientific research has changed this century.

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