Curriculum and Programs

Part Two: Can We Teach our Students How to Teach Themselves Critical Thinking?

Before the start of term this fall, I sat through two days of professional development with colleagues from a variety of disciplines. When the facilitator asked us what we wanted our students to be able to do after leaving our classes, one phrase that came up again and again was critical thinking—we want our students to leave our classes with stronger critical thinking skills than they came in with. The facilitator pushed back, asking us what we meant by that and what it looked like in our classrooms. There was a collective pause in the room. Lots of Read More…


Part One: Why the Humanities Matters in Higher Education

Elizabeth Martin is an Instructional Specialist in the Writing Studies Department at Montclair State University in New Jersey and a staff writer for American Mircoreviews & Interviews. She received her M.F.A. from William Paterson University. Her journalism has appeared in Parsippany Life, Neighbor News and The Suburban Trends. Her creative writing has been published by Neworld Review, Hot Metal Bridge and Menacing Hedge, among others. She’s the recipient of two New Jersey Press Association awards. Currently, she’s at work on a collection of essays. Near the start of every fall semester, I cancel classes for a week to have Read More…


Strategy Two: Emphasize the Relevance Logic for Students

In the second of this two-part series, Lori Watson, Ph.D., professor of philosophy and chair of the Department of Philosophy at University of San Diego, provides insight into “A Concise Introduction to Logic, 13th Edition” by Patrick J. Hurley, co-authored by Watson. As you use this text in your course, utilize Watson’s best practices in your own classroom. Students really enjoy Chapter Three on fallacies. Again, I find an effective teaching method is to get them excited about applying what they’re learning in class to material they come across outside class. An effective assignment here is to ask Read More…


Strategy One: Emphasize the Relevance Logic for Students

In the first of this two-part series, Lori Watson, Ph.D., professor of philosophy and chair of the Department of Philosophy at University of San Diego, provides insight into “A Concise Introduction to Logic, 13th Edition” by Patrick J. Hurley, co-authored by Watson. As you begin using this text in your course, utilize Watson’s best practices in your own classroom.

Arguments are Everywhere!

When teaching Chapter One, I find it really helps to have students look for arguments in the news media or blogs that they frequent—an assignment asking them to locate an argument on a topic they’re interested Read More…


Real-World Economic Analysis Through Writing

As Economics professors, we often stress the importance of certain types of kinesthetic learning. We tell students that they need to work problems—draw the graphs, do the math, etc.—in order to learn the material. Yet despite being well aware of the importance of learning by doing, we often overlook the value of making our students write. In the honors sections of my Principles classes, I have an assignment in which I ask students to explain a current event to me using economic principles or economics analysis. Their analysis can either explain why recent events occurred or predict what will happen in the future. I resist the urge to place limitations on what topic Read More…


The Journey to OER: A Panel Discussion

Affordability is an initiative higher education is confronting, spanning a host of areas including tuition and fees, and also, course materials. Supporting student retention, cost reduction and overall value is a strong focus at Cengage, says Cengage VP of Content Strategy, Cheryl Costantini, who hosted a panel discussion called “The Journey to OER.” It’s a strong focus for institutions, too. In our webinar, “The Journey to OER: A Panel Discussion,” learn what three experienced higher education professionals are saying about how schools can use resources effectively, one open textbook author’s insights on the OER market, and more.

How

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Expanding Excellence with the eText Initiative

Fall 2017 marks three years since the etext initiative rolled out at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College. We’ve experienced many successes: we saved our students money, increased communication and partnerships across the institution, and our students are more satisfied with their course materials than ever before. Now that we’ve found our groove, we’re ready to expand across more student populations—even beyond ourselves. You may be asking, “Haven’t you expanded already?” Yes, we expanded across Liberal Arts in 2014. In 2015, we expanded the etext initiative into another division at the College. In 2016, etext course offerings encompassed over 60% of the Read More…


Get Ready for the Solar Eclipse: An Astronomy Primer

Dr. Richard Gelderman of Western Kentucky University spoke with Heather Thompson of Cengage, sharing why more than astronomers are excited about this summer’s solar eclipse. Read on to get useful information about getting ready for August 21, 2017.
Heather Thompson: Generally, what can you tell me about the upcoming solar eclipse? Why are you so excited about it?
Richard Gelderman: What I can’t stress enough is that this eclipse goes beyond science. This is a HUMAN event, not just a science event. It applies to every subject area. You don’t need to care about science to appreciate the power Read More…


MindTap for English—Just One Thing: Questia

Audrey Wick, Cengage Faculty Partner and full-time English Professor at Blinn College in Texas, offers her experience with Questia through MindTap and why she recommends it for all students. If you want to give your students #JustOneThing, think about empowering them through access to quality research. That’s what students get with Questia through MindTap. More than a database, it’s an all-in-one digital library that helps students understand the research process, find reputable sources, obtain the information they need, and integrate the content with citations without ever leaving their virtual classroom space. Reluctant learners and those unfamiliar with academic libraries Read More…


Podcast: What Neuroscience Tells Us About How We Fall In Love

What is love? This question is usually asked by poets, playwrights and other artists, but today’s neuroscience has a lot to say about the matter, too. In this month’s podcasts, Dr. Freberg discusses “The Psychology of Love” and “Epigenetics in Intro Psych.”

Types of Love

“Love can be so many things, that’s why it’s such a big question,” says Dr. Laura Freberg, Professor of Psychology at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. “There’s the love we feel as parents for our children, the love we feel for our siblings, our parents, our friends, even our ideals.” Referring to the work of Read More…