Curriculum and Programs

Flipping the Classroom: Your Ideas and Experiences

Posts on the “flipped classroom” at the Cengage Learning Blog always generate a good deal of interest. We realized that many of you have implemented this model in your class, and that we could all benefit from your experiences. So, we recently asked our readers: “Have you flipped your classroom?” The poll included the question: What opportunities do you believe the flipped classroom model offers to students and instructors? We received a number of insightful comments, several of which we’ve shared below. Thanks to those of you who took the time to respond! If you’d like to share your experiences, add Read More…


Creating and Developing Mobile Apps

Imagine you had the time, knowledge, desire, and resources necessary to build your ideal mobile app. What would it be? Perhaps your app would support the academic goals you have for your classes. Or, it might help you accomplish your daily responsibilities while you’re on the go. Maybe you’d build something that would connect people who share your hobbies, interests, or the causes that are closest to your heart and mind. Given the steady growth of mobile-device usage, it’s not surprising that many schools are seeking ways to include mobile app development to their computing curricula—and thereby Read More…


Creating Video for Your Courses

For decades, the video camera has been a favorite tool of those who want to capture meaningful moments or present their creative vision onscreen. Over the years, many innovative instructors had also found ways to create video that inspired their students and demonstrated key course concepts in a way that transcended words. Now, with the growth of online learning and the rise of interest in the “flipped classroom” model, more instructors are choosing to use video as a means of presenting valuable course content. If you are among these instructors, you are likely also investigating the best tools you can use to Read More…


Print or e-Book: What’s Your Preference?

Our colleagues at CengageBrain.com recently asked students whether they preferred to use e-books or textbooks and thousands of students poured in to share their opinions. Printed textbooks took the lead in this head-to-head face-off with 73% of the votes, but e-books certainly had their die-hard advocates as well! Now, we’d like to hear from you. Perhaps you remain a proponent of the printed word; on the other hand, you could opt for an electronic book or journal article whenever one’s available. Or, your preferences could vary depending on the particular reason you’re reading or accessing information. Share your Read More…


Have You Participated in a MOOC?

Massive open online courses (aka “MOOCs”) have garnered a significant amount of discussion in recent months. Some view them as the next step in the evolution of old-style correspondence schools and newer-style distance and online learning practices. Others ponder the effect they’ll have on education as a whole, while still others wonder if they’re simply a fad. Wherever you fall on the spectrum of opinions surrounding MOOCs, we want to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the survey below!     Do you have any other experiences, opinions, or insights you want to share regarding MOOCs? Discuss them in the Read More…


Invite Your Students to #AskQuestia About Research Paper-Writing Basics

It’s that time of year. A certain briskness and crispness fills the air. Leaves turn their festive autumnal shades of orange, gold, and red. You take your favorite fall sweaters out of storage. And students begin the mad dash to complete their research papers. When you create your research project, you surely anticipate a number of student questions, especially as the due date approaches. Many of those questions will focus on the particulars of your assignment and the content-oriented questions that will arise as a result of the research process. However, others will have more to do with grammar, mechanics, identifying Read More…


Discover the Interactive, Digital Enhancements to Mankiw’s Seventh Edition

Contributed by John Carey. In a world where most undergrads have never known a time when they did not interact with a digital environment daily, the Seventh Edition of Greg Mankiw’s Principles of Economics, which publishes in late November 2013, will include the most extensive interactive digital experience thus far. Students will be able to engage the kinds of digital resources that they are expecting (demanding) through text, video, interactive graphs, graded assignments, and tutorials. My favorite new enhancement is the series of Mankiw Roadmap videos. For many of the chapters, Greg himself introduces the student to the material Read More…


Preparing for Your Lectures

Though your fall term may already be in full swing, you may have noticed that the students who once listened to your lectures attentively now seem more distracted and disengaged. Or, perhaps you’re a month or so into a new teaching job and you recognize a need to refine the process you use to prepare your talks. If you find yourself in these or similar scenarios, you may want to review some suggestions that can help you present your course material with maximum effectiveness. In McKeachie’s Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers, Marilla Svinicki and Wilbert Read More…


Tips for Students: Proofreading Your Paper

It’s a big day: you’re having your first meeting with a very important and influential person. You’ve given yourself a “pep talk” to calm your nerves, you’ve practiced what you want to say several times, and you’ve eaten approximately twelve breath mints. Filled with both confidence and nervous energy, you head out the door. Having given yourself ample time to travel to your meeting spot, you arrive ten minutes early. Still a bit antsy, you go into the restroom and check your teeth, your hair, and your makeup (if you wear it). Everything looks fine. But then, you look down… Read More…


Suggested Guidelines for Student Peer Review

In order for peer-review feedback to be valuable, it needs to offer a degree of specificity. A statement such as “that was great!” may give us a boost of confidence, but it doesn’t help us identify our opportunities for improvement. Likewise, “I didn’t like it” provides no direction in terms of what exactly would make the paper more accurate, informative, or interesting. Whether students will be exchanging peer reviews online, via e-mail, or in person, they will benefit by following a few guidelines that enable them to respond to one another’s writing with clarity, consistency, and respect. Today, Read More…