Engagement and Motivation

Who Are Our Students?

Whenever I am with teachers of beginning accounting I hear complaints about the new generation of students. “They won’t read the chapters. They won’t do the homework. They won’t come to class. And on and on.” One professor told me, “I’m so glad I’m going to retire next year so I don’t have to deal with these students anymore.” These comments were so common that a year or so ago I decided to examine the issue of “Who are our students?’ This Trends piece reports on what I found; why this generation is as good, only different, from past generations; and how I think we can engage these students.

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Classroom Disruption Management: A Causal-Preventive-Corrective Model

Have you recently been inside of a college classroom? Of course you have, since you are a college instructor. If you have been teaching for many years, you may have noticed that the atmosphere in the classroom has changed and not for the better. If you are a new instructor, you probably are second guessing your chosen career or maybe you feel that you needed better preparation for managing the classroom. This paper explores the problem of classroom disruption and offers a solution for classroom disruptions.

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How Can We Motivate Our Students?

In previous issues of AIR, Belverd E. Needles, Jr. first addressed the issue: “Who are our students?” by identifying the characteristics of our students that are important sources of the dissatisfaction many faculty feel toward their teaching situation (Winter 2006). He then addressed the issue: “What motivates our students?” by identifying some characteristics that will help us understand what motivates students today, how we can meet students on their own ground, and how we can improve the accounting learning process (Fall 2006). In this issue of Trends, he continues the discussion of how we as accounting instructors can deal with the challenges of today’s students by addressing the issue: “How can we motivate our students?” He will do this by first citing some research relevant to this issue and then describing the approach he takes in his classes.
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Develop Team Skills in Introduction to Accounting Courses

For more than two decades, employers have criticized the writing, oral communication, interpersonal, and teamwork skills of new college hires. As a result accounting professionals and educators have advocated that greater attention be given to skill or personal competency development in the accounting curriculum. In its Core Competency Framework, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) identified interaction as one of the key personal competencies, stating that accounting professionals must be able to work with others to accomplish objectives. The Institute of Management Accountants’ practice analysis (1999, 5) found that team participation and leadership was increasing. The report noted that more than 70 percent of management accountants work in companies where at least some management accountants serve on cross-functional teams. And the first position statement issued by the Accounting Education Change Commission (1990, 7) identified the ability to work with others, particularly in groups, as one of the capabilities needed by accounting graduates. These three documents echoed the accounting profession’s plea for enhanced team skills. As a result many business schools and accounting programs have introduced pedagogical changes into their curriculums. This article focuses on ways to enhance the development of students’ team or group skills.
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Personal Response System and Its Effects on Student Learning

A personal response system (PRS) was implemented during a summer session of introductory accounting. A PRS uses hand-held wireless transmitters, receivers, and computer software to obtain immediate feedback from students. The potential effectiveness of a PRS to increase learning is shown through a significant increase in exam scores, results of a student evaluation, and the instructor’s observations.
 
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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Model of Persistence

Today, we honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a champion of civil rights and a dedicated proponent of nonviolent challenges to injustice. Did you know that during his lifetime, Dr. King received several notable awards for his diligent devotion to human rights issues. In January, 1964, he was the first African-American named Time’s “Man of the Year.” In December of that same year, he became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. And of course, his legacy lives on through those who continue the fight for justice, equality, and positive social change.   This information, and much more, can be found using Read More…


Tips for Students: Participating Effectively in Discussions

At best, discussions can prove enlightening, engaging, and productive for all involved. At worst? We’re sure you have your own adjectives! Though you, as the instructor, generally play a role in moderating the discussions that take place in your class, your students bear the onus of participating in the discussion with respect, responsiveness, and responsibility. Given that your students may not come to your class knowing how to conduct a productive discussion, they may appreciate learning some of its basic elements. Cindy Griffin and Jennifer Emerling Bone’s text Invitation to Human Communication stress that, in order to be an Read More…


Helping Online Learners Assess Potential Distractions

Yesterday, we discussed ways that you can help reduce distractions so that students can stay focused on your presentations. However, a unique set of potential distractions awaits the online learner. Despite their best efforts to concentrate fully during a class session, online learners may face temptations that are not within the immediate reach of a student taking an on-site course. In such cases, an everyday item (such as a half-finished novel or a pile of laundry) can waylay every intention they had for devoting their full attention to their studies. Thus, if you are teaching an online course, you may Read More…


Preventing and Addressing Classroom Disruptions

Being an instructor is an exciting but often challenging position that carries with it an array of responsibilities. Not only are you responsible for classroom learning, but you must also operate as a leader in the classroom by fostering a professional atmosphere of respect and community-based sharing. Even without reading the article, you can probably think of how you might deal with situations of student incivility. In fact, to be a successful instructor today, this is exactly what you need to do. It is not advisable to wait for these incidents to pop up; planning ahead is one way to Read More…


Promoting Student Civility: Online and Offline

Student civility may seem like a common-sense issue for students to work out on their own, but encouraging professionalism with simple rules for respect and consideration for student interactions online and offline can go a long way toward fostering an environment conducive to learner engagement. Here, we offer tips to keeping your students’ online or on-ground class interactions respectful and professional from Dave Ellis’ , and from Ryan Watkins and Michael Corry’s E-Learning Companion: A Guide to Online Success, Fourth Edition. In on-ground classes, set some ground rules up front for students to agree to adhere to in Read More…