Engagement and Motivation

Collaborative Learning: Leveraging Social Learning Sites (Part 1 of 2)

Guest Contributor: Kristopher M. Carilli, Account Executive, ConnectYard. Part One of a Two-Part Series. For the past two decades a transformation has been occurring in teaching and learning circles. There has been a transition from the traditional lecture centered model of instruction to one that emphasizes student discussions and active engagement with curriculum content. The term “collaborative learning” has been coined to describe strategies that support the latter model, including learning communities, virtual learning communities, and social learning sites (SLS). The rapid advance of information technology and the growing popularity of social networking sites have provided additional opportunities to Read More…


Personal Learning Environments: A Way to Engage Students in Self-Regulated Learning

Guest Contributor: Nada Dabbagh, George Mason University. Many of today’s learners are likely to be familiar with, and facile with, today’s technologies. However, it can take some effort and skill to help them use and manage online resources to their fullest advantage within the educational setting. Today, Nada Dabbagh discusses how Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) can help your students learn to best manage their learning spaces and thus take greater charge of their own learning opportunities. Dabbagh, who serves as the professor and director of the Division of Learning Technologies in the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason Read More…


Learning Through Visuals

Contributor: Dr. Haig Kouyoudjian. A large body of research indicates that visual cues help us to better retrieve and remember information. The research outcomes on visual learning make complete sense when you consider that our brain is mainly an image processor (much of our sensory cortex is devoted to vision), not a word processor. In fact, the part of the brain used to process words is quite small in comparison to the part that processes visual images. Words are abstract and rather difficult for the brain to retain, whereas visuals are concrete and, as such, more easily remembered. To Read More…


The Use of Personal Response System in Accounting Courses

A Personal Response System uses hand-held wireless transmitters, receivers, and computer software to obtain immediate feedback from students. The technique is similar to “asking the audience” on the game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? This easy-to-use tool enhances interaction among students and the instructor and appears to increase learning. The classroom environment becomes more competitive as students strive to select correct answers to questions asked by the instructor. Any time during a lecture, the instructor can project a question on the screen or simply orally ask a question of the class and students provide answers. The instructor obtains immediate feedback that assesses the students’ understanding of the concept. Immediate feedback provides satisfaction to the students that they have mastered the concepts and identifies students’ misconceptions that a skillful instructor can correct through additional explanations and retest the students’ master through reformulation of additional questions.
 
The use of PRS appears to be a valuable tool for increasing interactivity within accounting courses. Not only is the technology easy to use but also available at low costs to universities. As instructors continue to develop courses that include the use of PRS, various research opportunities exist to determine whether PRS enhances learning
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Student’s Attitude of Accounting as a Profession: Can the Video “Takin’ Care of Business” Make a Difference?

Does the AICPA’s video “Takin’ Care of Business” market the accounting profession as dynamic and exciting, thereby countering negative stereotypes students often hold? Do other tools such as articles about accounting careers in the New Accountant magazine have similar effects on students? Should accounting educators devote valuable class time to showing the video or assigning readings?
 
This study uses a reliable attitude scale to determine whether college students’ positive perceptions of the profession increase after viewing the video and after reading an article with similar content from New Accountant magazine.

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Who Are Our Students?

Whenever I am with teachers of beginning accounting I hear complaints about the new generation of students. “They won’t read the chapters. They won’t do the homework. They won’t come to class. And on and on.” One professor told me, “I’m so glad I’m going to retire next year so I don’t have to deal with these students anymore.” These comments were so common that a year or so ago I decided to examine the issue of “Who are our students?’ This Trends piece reports on what I found; why this generation is as good, only different, from past generations; and how I think we can engage these students.

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Classroom Disruption Management: A Causal-Preventive-Corrective Model

Have you recently been inside of a college classroom? Of course you have, since you are a college instructor. If you have been teaching for many years, you may have noticed that the atmosphere in the classroom has changed and not for the better. If you are a new instructor, you probably are second guessing your chosen career or maybe you feel that you needed better preparation for managing the classroom. This paper explores the problem of classroom disruption and offers a solution for classroom disruptions.

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How Can We Motivate Our Students?

In previous issues of AIR, Belverd E. Needles, Jr. first addressed the issue: “Who are our students?” by identifying the characteristics of our students that are important sources of the dissatisfaction many faculty feel toward their teaching situation (Winter 2006). He then addressed the issue: “What motivates our students?” by identifying some characteristics that will help us understand what motivates students today, how we can meet students on their own ground, and how we can improve the accounting learning process (Fall 2006). In this issue of Trends, he continues the discussion of how we as accounting instructors can deal with the challenges of today’s students by addressing the issue: “How can we motivate our students?” He will do this by first citing some research relevant to this issue and then describing the approach he takes in his classes.
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Develop Team Skills in Introduction to Accounting Courses

For more than two decades, employers have criticized the writing, oral communication, interpersonal, and teamwork skills of new college hires. As a result accounting professionals and educators have advocated that greater attention be given to skill or personal competency development in the accounting curriculum. In its Core Competency Framework, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) identified interaction as one of the key personal competencies, stating that accounting professionals must be able to work with others to accomplish objectives. The Institute of Management Accountants’ practice analysis (1999, 5) found that team participation and leadership was increasing. The report noted that more than 70 percent of management accountants work in companies where at least some management accountants serve on cross-functional teams. And the first position statement issued by the Accounting Education Change Commission (1990, 7) identified the ability to work with others, particularly in groups, as one of the capabilities needed by accounting graduates. These three documents echoed the accounting profession’s plea for enhanced team skills. As a result many business schools and accounting programs have introduced pedagogical changes into their curriculums. This article focuses on ways to enhance the development of students’ team or group skills.
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Personal Response System and Its Effects on Student Learning

A personal response system (PRS) was implemented during a summer session of introductory accounting. A PRS uses hand-held wireless transmitters, receivers, and computer software to obtain immediate feedback from students. The potential effectiveness of a PRS to increase learning is shown through a significant increase in exam scores, results of a student evaluation, and the instructor’s observations.
 
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