Engagement and Motivation

Taking Advantage of Your Students’ Smartphones

Author: Machiavelli W. Chao, Lecturer Continuing, The Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California, Irvine Many, many years ago, when I was an undergraduate student, the drill was pretty standard: I sat in a classroom for lectures, did my written homework and physically handed it to a TA. And, if I had any questions, I waited in front of my professor’s office and hoped he could see me.  My, how times have changed. Enter Mobile Technology With the rapid emergence of mobile technology, students now clamor to take online and hybrid courses. They use their tablets to Read More…


Improving Pass Rates in Intermediate Accounting 1 Through Student Engagement

Authors, all from Cleveland State University: Craig Fotin, DBA, CPA, Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting; Heidi Hylton Meier, DBA, CPA, Chair and Professor, Department of Accounting; Jan Rose, MBA, CPA, CMA, Lecturer of Accounting; Peter Poznanski, Ph.D., CPA, CMA, CFM, Professor Emeritus, Department of Accounting   After completing Principles of Accounting I (financial accounting) and II (managerial accounting), most Accounting majors enroll in Intermediate Accounting 1 . For almost all students, the quantity and difficulty level of the material makes Intermediate Accounting one of the most difficult courses they will take in their degree program. Compounding this difficulty level is the Read More…


9 Management Myths, Debunked!

As an instructor, you want your students to gain the skills needed to think and act like successful managers. Unfortunately, it’s easy for new managers to fall for the many myths about what good managers do. Check out these nine management myths, plus discover ways to help your students navigate the management world. MANAGEMENT MYTH #1: There’s only one right way to lead or manage. THE TRUTH: Leadership can be customized for different employees. Hersey and Blanchard argue employees have different levels of readiness for handling different jobs, responsibilities and work assignments. Accordingly, Hersey and Blanchard’s situational theory states that leaders need Read More…


Adjusting the Lens: Active Learning in Online Classes

Author: Shawn Orr, Director of the Center for Innovation & Teaching Excellence; Professor of Communication Studies, Ashland University As a college faculty member for more than 25 years, I’ve taught thousands of undergraduate students in a traditional classroom setting, utilizing active learning strategies to engage and involve students in the learning process. Changing charts, card flip, expert groups, clearest/muddiest point, group projects, polling, augmented reality and case studies—all tools of the trade I know, love and use every semester. Then came online classes. I taught my first completely online course 15 years ago. I’ll be the first to admit it was Read More…


Teaching with Technology: 2 Tools to Increase Engagement and Success

Author: Eugene Matthews, Ph.D., Park University  Tool #1: ZipGrade An Inexpensive, but Effective App ZipGrade is one of two mobile applications I use consistently to reduce my grading time by at least 90%, evaluate my teaching and student knowledge, reduce student anxiety and enhance student success. Here’s how I make it work for me. As the name implies, ZipGrade is a simple and inexpensive mobile application (approx. $15.00 annually) which lives in the cloud and works through my smartphone. It uses Creative Commons downloadable Scantron-style question sheets (20, 50, 100), which I add to my quizzes and exams. After Read More…


Icebreakers and Topic Starters

By: Shawn Orr, Director of the Center for Innovation and Teaching Excellence, Faculty in Communication Studies at Ashland University – Ohio Icebreakers often come with a dreaded connotation that implies frivolous activities done on the first day of class with limited benefits to student learning. Consider that one icebreaker—”introduce yourself and tell us one interesting thing about yourself”—that is used over and over while yielding little enthusiasm or class engagement. Yet, semester after semester, we pull that icebreaker out and use it again. Why? Because we want to start the semester off by fostering student connection and community. This Read More…


Three Steps to Becoming a Culturally Responsive Teacher: Rated KR (Keeping It Real)

 By: Essie Childers, Education Professor at Blinn College – Texas   Let’s take a moment to step away from facts around student retention, building facilities, growing partnerships and enrollment numbers. Albeit, those topics are truly important and can be found on any college or university’s agenda. What about adding to the agenda expected classroom experiences to promote student learning. The secret is out—instructors are at the “front door” to facilitate student learning; they also help promote retention and build enrollment. How? This is possible when instructors become culturally responsive teachers.

What IS Culturally Responsive Teaching?

“Culturally responsive teaching occurs when there is Read More…


ConnectYard: My Favorite Feature in MindTap English

by Ginny Dow, Liberty University English Professor and Cengage Faculty Partner Students love connecting with friends and family on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter. In fact, they are often more engaged on social media than they are in face-to-face encounters. How do we transfer that desire to engage into the classroom? I want my English students to be excited to learn literature. Far-fetched idea? Maybe, but my goal is that they find some literary work that they love, even if that is only one poem, short story or play throughout the whole semester. My #JustOneThing which enhances student Read More…


Four Ways Going Digital Makes Humanities Courses More Enjoyable

You just heard another student say, “I’m only taking this course because I needed another Gen Ed credit to graduate.” After everything you’ve put into your course, they’re only taking it because they have to? Unfortunately, students are often unpleasantly surprised to learn that humanities courses are in their future. At most institutions, students will take at least one required humanities or social sciences course. While students may not know the intention behind such a requirement, it’s our responsibility to make sure they reap the benefits from our courses. We strive to make the content relevant while sharpening students’ critical Read More…


Learn How to Break Down Digital Barriers in Art History Instruction

Teaching art history from slide carousels might be a thing of a past, but the transition into digital doesn’t have to be difficult for faculty or students. Modern-age students now expect learning to be easily accessible, interactive and align clearly with the reading materials. Introducing MindTap—where those expectations are met through an approachable learning experience in a clearly organized digital format. Art History faculty at Genesee Community College have found that MindTap helps develop a unified teaching approach between multiple faculty teaching different course sections—especially when bridging traditional and online courses. GCC has integrated MindTap into most of our Read More…