AIR Fall 2011

Empirical Analysis of the Use of Accounting Workshops to Improve Outcomes in the Introductory Accounting Course

Introductory Accounting is one of the foundation courses in most business curricula. While some students do very well with the content, there are significant numbers who do not successfully complete the course or receive a minimal passing grade. In an effort to improve student success and increase retention, midterm and final study workshops were implemented. The implementation and assessment of the accounting workshops are discussed in this paper. Read More…


Playing the Double Entry Monopoly Game – Active Learning in Accounting Principles and Practices

Worldwide sales of the famous board game Monopoly® exceeded 250 million in 103 countries (Daffey, 2008). An estimated half a billion people are believed to have played the game Monopoly (Dixon, 2009), and more than 200 editions have been released in 37 languages (Daffey, 2008). Have you ever wondered why Madonna is so successful and rich? Apparently her favourite board game as a 10-year old child was Monopoly (Day, 2008). There is even a Monopoly World Championship for this popular game (Dixon, 2009). Why not use this famous board game in our accounting classroom? Needles (2011) explain that the diverse group of students in introductory principles of accounting classes makes it necessary to present the subject matter that will arouse their interest because motivating them to want to learn accounting is always a major challenge.

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Teaching Judgment in Beginning Accounting

Beginning accounting focuses mostly on definitions, procedures, and calculations: 1. What is an asset and how does it differ from an expense?, 2. How do you record the purchase of an asset or an expense?, 3. How do you calculate the amount of an expense or how much of an asset that has been expired?, and 4. How much are total assets or expenses? There are straight-forward answers to these questions, but it is important to encourage students, most of whom will have only one or two accounting courses in their academic careers, to consider the judgments that underline Read More…


Accounting Instructors’ Report, Fall 2011: Table of Contents

TRENDS

Teaching Judgment in Beginning Accounting
Belverd E. Needles, Jr., Ph.D., CPA

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A Classroom Aid for GASB 54 Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions

GASB 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions issued in March 2009, is yet to find its way into many textbooks currently being used for Non Profit and Governmental Accounting courses. The objective of the current paper is to suggest a way to include this update in the class lectures. It is hoped that the use of summary tables and brief summaries of the complex new requirements will ease the learning curve for the students and help instructors convey the information in an effective manner. Read More…


Leveraging Narrative Learning Tools: A Pedagogical Discourse to Teaching Introductory Accounting Courses

This paper outlines a narrative discourse strategy to teaching accounting courses. It discusses narrative learning tools, demonstrating how students make use of the “Aha moment,” relating new knowledge to make a direct connection to their study of accounting concepts. During the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007, a pedagogical/narrative discourse to teaching introductory financial and managerial accounting courses was a strategy used as a vehicle for evoking students’ awareness of and curiosity for their individual knowledge acquisition in accounting courses. Using this strategy requires a combination of: 1. pre-post assessments, 2. Journalizing, 3. lecture series or professional business meetings, Read More…


A Visualization of Teaching the Indirect Method for Computing Cash from Operations

The Statement of Cash Flows (SCF) complements the Statement of Financial Position and the Statement of Comprehensive Income by explaining where the cash came from (cash receipts) and how the cash was spent (cash payments) (Harrison Jr. et al. 2011; Powers and Needles Jr. 2010). International Accounting Standard (IAS) 7 requires companies to classify cash flows during the accounting period according to operating, investing and financing activities (International Accounting Standards Board 2010). IAS 7 also requires companies to report net cash flows from operating activities using either the direct method or the indirect method (International Accounting Standards Board 2010). Read More…