AIR Spring 2013

Accounting Instructors’ Report, Spring 2013: Table of Contents

TRENDS
Our Changing Environment in First-Year Accounting
Belverd E. Needles, Editor
 
ARTICLE
Taking Part In Accounting Competitions/Challenges/Cases—Benefits To Your Students and Your School
Stephen J. Bukowy, University of North Carolina
 
TEACHING CASES
An Activity-Based Costing Application Using a Video of Olive Oil Production
Karen S. Cravens, The University of Tulsa
Elizabeth Goad Oliver, Washington & Lee University
 
Understanding Management Control in a Small Business: An Entrepreneurial Micro-Business Case (The Hot Dog Cart)
Delwyn D. Devries, Belmont University
Tanya Lee, Valdosta State University
 
TEACHING TECHNIQUE
Read More…


Understanding Management Control in a Small Business: An Entrepreneurial Micro-Business Case

This case can be used to help undergraduate accounting students understand risks and controls in a very simple business, a hot dog cart. This case is appropriate for use in first-year accounting. For instance, it is relevant at the point in financial accounting where internal control is covered or in managerial accounting where business objectives, processes, risks, and controls are covered. An objective is to provide an easily understood scenario for students with no, or limited, business experience to introduce the concept of enterprise risk management and related controls.  Read More…


Taking Part In Accounting Competitions/Challenges/Cases—Benefits To Your Students and Your School

Did your school play in the BCS Championships, Final Four, College World Series? How about having a multitude of firms recruiting on your campus? Located near major markets? If your answer to the preceding questions was no, you are pretty much in the same boat as us. So how do you go about exciting your new Accounting majors about your program and improving your graduating Accounting students’ chances of securing that good position or internship?

We have found that by participating in some of the various Accounting Competitions/Challenges, we have gained name recognition for the school and provided opportunities for recruiting and exciting our incoming Accounting majors while securing opportunities for our upper level Accounting majors in terms of internships and job offers. Read More…


Our Changing Environment in First-Year Accounting

Beginning with this issue Accounting Instructors’ Report and continuing in several future issues, Needles proposes to address the effects of changes in accounting education and suggest ways of addressing those changes. It is worth beginning with a look at the factors that have influenced recent changes in accounting education. Read More…


An Activity-Based Costing Application Using a Video of Olive Oil Production

Anecdotally, most instructors can appreciate that students learn more effectively when they are engaged and involved in the educational process. Creating a learning environment that fosters involvement can be a particular challenge in accounting. As educators in the domain of business, we have natural applications that can demonstrate how the concepts we discuss in class can affect what really happens in business. Since many students have limited experience in business and find it difficult understanding how accounting concepts might be important to them, simulations or other types of activities can help to “place the assignment in an authentic perspective” (Seaton and Boyd, 2008, 110).

We have developed an activity-based costing application using olive oil production as the base to help students understand the manufacturing process. Using a short video, students can immediately identify the collection of activities that ultimately comprise the cost of a bottle of olive oil and understand how the costs involved are created. Read More…


The Use of Visual Aids in Financial Reporting Courses

Existing literature suggests that visual aids increase learning, particularly where complex materials are being presented. Baker, Jones and Burkman (2009) provide a framework that suggests that sense making will be improved by visual aids when the visual aids possess several of the following four aspects: (1) support the four basic human visual perceptual approaches of association, differentiation, ordered perception, and quantitative perception, (2) have strong Gestalt properties, (3) are consistent with the viewer’s stored knowledge, and (4) support analogical reasoning.

This paper discusses the author’s experience with two applications of visual aids in his financial reporting courses. Although he discusses the specific application of these visual aids to the topic of intercompany investments, the general approach should be applicable to other financial accounting topics. Read More…