AIR

Accounting Instructors’ Report, Winter 2012: Table of Contents


Why Accounting? Questions and The Evolution of Accounting Concepts

Once upon a time, long, long ago, accounting began to reduce events to numbers to capture and bring meaning to data and it was good. Concepts were agreed upon and accounting techniques evolved to analyze and resolve business issues. This article is about why concepts came first and are foundational to understanding accounting, especially managerial accounting. Read More…


Debtor Accounting for Troubled Debt Restructuring: A Classroom Example to Teach Theory vs. Practice

Debtor accounting for troubled-debt restructurings (TDR) is inconsistent with the two most recent revisions to the conceptual framework of accounting. This paper discusses the current accounting treatment of modifications of terms under a TDR and presents an alternative approach that is consistent with the conceptual framework. An example is provided to help students understand TDR accounting and more generally, the relationship between the conceptual framework of accounting and reporting standards.
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Understanding Management Control in a Small Business: An Entrepreneurial Micro-Business Case

This case can be used to help undergraduate accounting students understand risks and controls in a very simple business, a hot dog cart. This case is appropriate for use in first-year accounting. For instance, it is relevant at the point in financial accounting where internal control is covered or in managerial accounting where business objectives, processes, risks, and controls are covered. An objective is to provide an easily understood scenario for students with no, or limited, business experience to introduce the concept of enterprise risk management and related controls.  Read More…


A Practice Set for Use With the Cognitive Apprenticeship Approach to Teaching Introductory Accounting and Tests of its Effectiveness

The objective of this project was to develop a short practice set to be used as a culminating project in an introductory accounting course and used in a manner consistent with the cognitive apprenticeship approach to teaching. In the cognitive apprenticeship model, the educational process starts with students following and observing the work of an expert. Following that, students work independently but can access the help and support of the expert if needed. Finally the students reflect on the work done and identify any deficiencies. Read More…


Presentations with Maximum Impact: Moving Faculty Forward

Public speaking is a way of life for almost all accounting faculty. We speak multiple times a week for student audiences in class. Further, we also present for groups of practicing professionals, to campus colleagues in administrative meetings, and for faculty peers at conferences related to our discipline. However, few of us have significant formal training in giving presentations (beyond high school speech class!). There appears to be an implicit assumption that accurate content is the main requirement for making an effective presentation. But as frequent audience members as well, we know that assumption is not true. We know there are speakers who are more compelling, interesting, and easy to follow. Is good speaking only a matter of raw talent, or is there some guidance available that could make us more effective in this venture?
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Teaching Process Costing

Process costing is one of the most vexing areas in all of cost or managerial accounting. Compared to job order costing it is typically seen as confusing and cumbersome. I have developed over the past ten years of teaching cost accounting what I believe is an effective “process” for teaching process costing. I will explain my method in four steps followed by some suggested teaching tips. This article is from the Accounting Instructors’ Report, an electronic journal that provides teaching tips and insights to those who teach accounting and other business courses. Contributor:
Ronald R. Rubenfield, Robert Morris College
 
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Analyzing Overhead Variance Without Utilizing a Single Formula

The purpose of this article is to address the notion that overhead variance analysis is a topic that is too difficult for the basic Managerial Accounting course. Many faculty members feel that since overhead analysis appears to be “formula driven,” it is not worth covering. The authors feel that with the increase in importance on overhead costs in virtually all organizations, the deletion of this topic could significantly decrease a firm’s ability to control cost. Read More…


K&J Bakery Inc. A Simplified Management Accounting Course

The objective of this project is to provide students with a practical application of some of the key concepts discuss in the managerial accounting course. It can be used as a half-semester long or concept driven project i.e., used along with the concepts/topics as they are introduced throughout the course.
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Taking Part In Accounting Competitions/Challenges/Cases—Benefits To Your Students and Your School

Did your school play in the BCS Championships, Final Four, College World Series? How about having a multitude of firms recruiting on your campus? Located near major markets? If your answer to the preceding questions was no, you are pretty much in the same boat as us. So how do you go about exciting your new Accounting majors about your program and improving your graduating Accounting students’ chances of securing that good position or internship?

We have found that by participating in some of the various Accounting Competitions/Challenges, we have gained name recognition for the school and provided opportunities for recruiting and exciting our incoming Accounting majors while securing opportunities for our upper level Accounting majors in terms of internships and job offers. Read More…