classroom management

Using Mobile Technology in the Classroom and Beyond

Chances are, if you’re reading this post on your computer or on a handheld device, you have some familiarity with online technology and feel comfortable with it. Hopefully, you’re the kind of instructor who is open and eager to utilize the growing list of free and fabulous websites and apps that are readily available to you and your students—resources that drive collaboration, organization, and even fun. At Cengage Learning’s 18th Annual Course Technology Conference, Professor Gina Bowes-Miller of Harrisburg Area Community College presented Using Mobile Technology in the Classroom and Beyond. In the video below, you can learn how Professor Bowers-Miller has used Read More…


Your Feedback & Experiences: Teaching Online

Today, the feedback we share focuses on readers’ experiences and best practices for teaching and learning online — a topic we address frequently on the blog. We hope you’ll gain insight from their ideas, and feel inspired to share your own best practices. Do you teach online? Would you like to discuss your thoughts or experiences? Add your comments below, or send them to [email protected].   I’ve migrated two F2F [face-to-face] classes to the online format, and I’m in the process of creating another. My basic philosophy is that students should not have MORE work to do in an online Read More…


Getting Students Up To Speed on Your Online Course — Quickly

It’s critical to make sure that your students know the important administrative details associated with your course. However, it’s also imperative that you devote as much class time as possible to your course content. In the summer (or in any abbreviated course), it’s especially noticeable, as the number of course sessions and the time you have with your students is much more compact than it is during a standard term. When you’re teaching online, students also must become accustomed to the setup of your your course’s Learning Management System (LMS). During these shorter summer sessions, you’re likely seeking Read More…


Conquering Distraction In and Out of the Classroom

For all its benefits, our use of technology has introduced certain challenges into our modern lives, including an increased sense of distraction and information overload. Of course, technology in and of itself is not the problem. In order to keep from feeling overwhelmed, we must master technology, rather than allowing it to master us. Many of the students who enter your classroom are “digital natives” quite accustomed to communicating and finding information online — and also quite attached to their technology devices. Fortunately, you as an instructor can play a role in raising these students’ awareness of how they can use this Read More…


Hot Technologies and Cool Applications for Your Classroom

Whether you teach history or human physiology, accounting or architecture, there’s a way for you to bring the latest technologies into your classroom in an engaging and entertaining way. In this presentation from Cengage Learning’s 18th Annual Course Technology Conference, Mark Frydenberg and Corinne Hoisington demonstrate how you can use a variety of technologies and applications to get your students involved in and excited about the topics you’re covering in class that day. You’ll see a variety of low- and no-cost tools that allow you to share and collaborate over online content, build dynamic timelines, create interactive images, “publish” your own Read More…


Social Networking as a Solution, Not a Distraction

If you are thinking about using social media in your classroom, before you even set up an account, have a goal in mind. Successful and productive social media activity can be a solution to a problem. Do you want to have more connection with the students in your classes? Google+ could help you do that. Are you looking to get timely information specific to your course subject matter from relevant sources? Twitter could be a good option. Or are you just trying to get students more engaged in class by having them use visuals? Read More…


Learning Through Visuals

Contributor: Dr. Haig Kouyoudjian. A large body of research indicates that visual cues help us to better retrieve and remember information. The research outcomes on visual learning make complete sense when you consider that our brain is mainly an image processor (much of our sensory cortex is devoted to vision), not a word processor. In fact, the part of the brain used to process words is quite small in comparison to the part that processes visual images. Words are abstract and rather difficult for the brain to retain, whereas visuals are concrete and, as such, more easily remembered. To Read More…


Classroom Disruption Management: A Causal-Preventive-Corrective Model

Have you recently been inside of a college classroom? Of course you have, since you are a college instructor. If you have been teaching for many years, you may have noticed that the atmosphere in the classroom has changed and not for the better. If you are a new instructor, you probably are second guessing your chosen career or maybe you feel that you needed better preparation for managing the classroom. This paper explores the problem of classroom disruption and offers a solution for classroom disruptions.

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Helping Online Learners Assess Potential Distractions

Yesterday, we discussed ways that you can help reduce distractions so that students can stay focused on your presentations. However, a unique set of potential distractions awaits the online learner. Despite their best efforts to concentrate fully during a class session, online learners may face temptations that are not within the immediate reach of a student taking an on-site course. In such cases, an everyday item (such as a half-finished novel or a pile of laundry) can waylay every intention they had for devoting their full attention to their studies. Thus, if you are teaching an online course, you may Read More…


Preventing and Addressing Classroom Disruptions

Being an instructor is an exciting but often challenging position that carries with it an array of responsibilities. Not only are you responsible for classroom learning, but you must also operate as a leader in the classroom by fostering a professional atmosphere of respect and community-based sharing. Even without reading the article, you can probably think of how you might deal with situations of student incivility. In fact, to be a successful instructor today, this is exactly what you need to do. It is not advisable to wait for these incidents to pop up; planning ahead is one way to Read More…