collaboration

Assignment Idea: Nurture Collaboration and Campus Appreciation with Digital

Group assignments offer students the chance to experience variety in assignments, break free of comfort zones, maybe make new friends, and ultimately learn how to successfully collaborate with peers who have a common goal. In Michelle Davidson’s Business Professional Writing course at The University of Toledo, the common goal was an assignment:  to create a digital field guide to campus.  Students were tasked to work in groups and use WordPress to create a digital field guide showcasing an element of campus life.  This assignment required students to compose appropriate, descriptive copy and illustrate their ideas with visual images.  Responses Read More…


Share Stories of Student Collaboration with Digital and Win!

How do you encourage student collaboration in a digital environment? Share your story of successful student teamwork with your peers in our Make It Count contest. You could win excellent prizes, including a $100 gift card now and a paid trip to a national conference later.

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College Student Collaboration In and Out of the Classroom

Today’s college students are more accustomed than ever to taking classes remotely and forming their social groups online. Does this mean they’re ready to cut the cord from collaborating with their classmates too? While some interpret the rise of texting to be “the downfall of human language,” in reality, teens and young adults are communicating more than ever before — almost non-stop. The same goes for classroom work, and may be a reflection of the way students hope to access information–instantly. Students have some of the busiest, most chaotic schedules out there, yet collaborating with their classmates doesn’t seem to Read More…


Perfecting College Students’ Note Sharing Practices

We asked our community of college students: “Do you share lecture and course notes with other students?” Thirty-three percent of respondents replied that they do either share or borrow (or both) notes with their classmates, while 67% said they don’t share or borrow notes.

In the past, there may have been a negative stigma surrounding getting additional help or sharing notes. However, many instructors now are finding ways to help their students be productive and ethical when sharing notes outside of the classroom. It’s important for students to learn how to take and, when appropriate, share notes with fellow classmates. Read More…