college students

Part One: Why the Humanities Matter in Higher Education

Elizabeth Martin is an Instructional Specialist in the Writing Studies Department at Montclair State University in New Jersey and a staff writer for American Mircoreviews & Interviews. She received her M.F.A. from William Paterson University. Her journalism has appeared in Parsippany Life, Neighbor News and The Suburban Trends. Her creative writing has been published by Neworld Review, Hot Metal Bridge and Menacing Hedge, among others. She’s the recipient of two New Jersey Press Association awards. Currently, she’s at work on a collection of essays. Near the start of every fall semester, I cancel classes for a week to have Read More…


Strategy Two: Emphasize the Relevance Logic for Students

In the second of this two-part series, Lori Watson, Ph.D., professor of philosophy and chair of the Department of Philosophy at University of San Diego, provides insight into “A Concise Introduction to Logic, 13th Edition” by Patrick J. Hurley, co-authored by Watson. As you use this text in your course, utilize Watson’s best practices in your own classroom. Students really enjoy Chapter Three on fallacies. Again, I find an effective teaching method is to get them excited about applying what they’re learning in class to material they come across outside class. An effective assignment here is to ask Read More…


Strategy One: Emphasize the Relevance Logic for Students

In the first of this two-part series, Lori Watson, Ph.D., professor of philosophy and chair of the Department of Philosophy at University of San Diego, provides insight into “A Concise Introduction to Logic, 13th Edition” by Patrick J. Hurley, co-authored by Watson. As you begin using this text in your course, utilize Watson’s best practices in your own classroom.

Arguments are Everywhere!

When teaching Chapter One, I find it really helps to have students look for arguments in the news media or blogs that they frequent—an assignment asking them to locate an argument on a topic they’re interested Read More…


Prepping Students for the Workforce—One Career Project at a Time

In preparing students for the 21st century, we must revisit our curriculum and ask a very important question: “Am I preparing students to compete in a global society, equipping them with the skills requested by prospective employers?” Julie Bort, in her article, 3 Skills College Grads Still Need to Learn to Impress Hiring Managers, posits a survey conducted by compensation software company PayScale. The survey included 64,000 hiring managers and about 14,000 college grads. Interestingly, 44% of the managers pointed out that writing proficiency is a skill in which recent college graduates were deficient. This Read More…


Stats Beyond STEM

Anne Arundel Community College (AACC), a much lauded school located in Arnold, Maryland, recently announced that for students not seeking degrees in either science, technology, engineering or math (STEM), college algebra or trigonometry will no longer be a mandatory prerequisite. The school instead offers a course they believe to be more immediately relevant for a non-STEM student—elementary statistics. This shift from the traditional model—to mandate that all students take a beyond high-school algebra course—is happening in schools all over the country, and it makes sense. Jobs in America dependent upon statistics knowledge are projected to Read More…