critical thinking

Course-Embedded Outcomes Assessments Using The Wall Street Journal: An Evaluation Rubric and Follow-up Survey

In this post-Enron era and its aftermath, employers value accounting graduates who possess skills beyond necessary technical accounting proficiency. Even as the body of accounting knowledge grows, important skills such as critical thinking, writing, ethical awareness and potentially teamwork can be developed through a structured project that utilizes the insights into accounting practice generated regularly by independent knowledge repositories such as The Wall Street Journal. Once in place a Wall Street Journal or similar project provides the instructor an efficient means to witness, monitor and document student progress in developing skill-related learning outcomes. Additionally, the grading process provides the instructor an opportunity to learn about challenges facing accounting practitioners especially in this time of heightened ethical awareness and the resultant expansion of professional services.

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Critical Thinking Skills and the AICPA Core Competency Framework

In most schools, accounting principles courses are for accounting majors as well as all other business majors. As educators, we want to make sure the accounting majors graduate with the skills they will need in the profession. However, we also want to provide non-accounting majors with the basic accounting knowledge they will need in their future careers. Additionally, we should aspire to improve the critical thinking skills of all students, regardless of major. The AICPA Core Competency Framework (CCF) provides a comprehensive list of the competencies the profession demands of entry-level accountants (AICPA, 2005). The Steps for Better Thinking (SBT) Model (Lynch & Wolcott, 2001) provides a way to assess the critical thinking skills of students in college. These two constructs actually relate to one another, which means that we can provide skill improvement opportunities for all students in accounting principles courses, regardless of their majors. Read More…


Activity: Evaluating Online News Articles

It’s certainly easy to search for and find news articles online. Some are available at the online “home” of well-known, traditional news publications, or at equally reputable news websites that nevertheless have no print counterpart. Others can be accessed via the research databases on offer at your library. Still others may appear in your social-media feeds, or crop up at sites that “syndicate” content from a variety of sites with varying degrees of reliability or authority. Though it’s always important to get your news from a reliable source, it’s especially important to students who want or need to use online materials for their research projects. As students Read More…


Using Technology to Foster Students’ Critical Thinking Skills

If you’re actively seeking to inspire your students to build their critical-thinking skills, you likely realize that having an array of dynamic, engaging activities and assignments at your disposal can help them dive into course concepts and hone their ability to think more critically in the process. However, it can often be a challenge to find and develop those ideas and activities—so the ability to glean new ideas from a colleague can be valuable. As you watch today’s featured webinar,  you’ll be able to do just that! In “Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Using Technology to Reach Out to Different Learning Read More…


Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism

If your course involves a research project, or if you’re teaching students the skills related to information literacy, you likely address the topic of plagiarism as it relates to their work. Though some students may readily recognize the seriousness of the matter, it may not “sink in” for others quite so easily. To ensure that all students grasp the impact that plagiarism could have on their academic careers, it pays to discuss it in earnest. In the Annotated Instructor’s Edition for FOCUS on College Success, Fourth Edition, Dr. Constance Staley recommends the following in-class activity, which can prompt students to Read More…


Critical Thinking and Writing Assignments

As an educator, you know that the ability to thoroughly evaluate information and its sources plays a vital role in students’ development as independent, critical thinkers. Through your lectures and your assignments, you challenge students to think deeply about the information they encounter on a daily basis. You also want them to learn how to evaluate the arguments presented in what they’re reading and writing, and you want them to be able to back up their own claims with evidence that supports the points that they wish to communicate to others. If you are seeking additional ways to build critical-thinking Read More…


Teaching Innovative Problem Solving

This paper presents a practical approach to teaching students to ‘Think Outside the Box.’ Defining a mental box as having the four constructs of Curiosity, Openness, Risk and Energy, the paper describes how these can be measured and then expanded using a series of assignments designed to increase each of the constructs. Examples of some of the assignments are given with explanations.

 

Contributors:

Charles J.F. Leflar, Ph.D., CPA, University of Arkansas
Katie L. Terrell, MBA, University of Arkansas

 

Read Teaching Innovative Problem Solving.


Problem-Solving in Teams: Secrets of Success

You or your students may be placed on a team tasked with resolving a particular issue or addressing a particular challenge. Or, your existing teams may, on occasion, need to come up with a solution to a problem that arises on the course towards completing a project. For this reason, knowing how to solve problems as a team plays an important role in reaching a successful solution. In her book Communicating for Results: A Guide for Business and the Professions, Tenth Edition, Cheryl Hamilton describes eight key behaviors that enable teams to successfully collaborate on solutions to Read More…


Tips for Students: Become a More Critical Thinker

Throughout this week at Engaging Minds, we’ve presented posts that offer a number of suggestions for incorporating critical-thinking skills, activities, and strategies into your classroom. We also wanted to present some takeaway points that your students can use as they seek to hone their critical-thinking abilities. In her book Essentials of Study Skills, Eighth Edition, Linda Wong presents several principles that can help students stay focused on their journey towards becoming more critical thinkers. We’ve summarized them below:

    Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Embrace curiosity! Grow your own knowledge by seeking out information on the topics that
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Critical Thinking and Mass Media

As students develop their critical-thinking skills through completion of their coursework, they’ll also be better prepared to evaluate the information (or misinformation) presented in the television programs they watch and the publications that they read on a regular basis. However, learning to discern the meaning behind the message can take practice, especially if they’re used to viewing this material simply as “entertainment.” In his book Becoming a Critical Thinker, Eighth Edition, Vincent Ryan Ruggiero offers a number of exercises that guide students through the process of applying their critical-thinking skills as they watch and read information that Read More…