featured

Criminal Justice Students Get More Employable with MindTap

Guest contributor:  by Scott Rudeen, Ph.D.(ABD), MBA, MA, MSM   Throughout this criminal justice blog series, I have explored the wide range of skills students need to be successful in the criminal justice field. They must be able to exhibit the skills, attributes and behaviors employers want in order to secure a job and develop a career in criminal justice. But, exactly how can and should our students demonstrate their skills to start their careers in criminal justice? Students tend to only consider projects or reports from a capstone course to showcase these employability skills, if at all. Many times these may Read More…


How MindTap Math Foundations Enhanced My Class

Contributor: Yvette Hassakoursian, Glendale Community College (Glendale, CA) The first time I saw MindTap Math Foundations (MTMF) I was astounded by all the implications and possibilities.  MTMF is an all-inclusive solution for all different kinds of learners and all different kinds of instructors.  I had the opportunity to try MTMF with my class and here are the top three ways MTMF benefited myself and my students.

Top Three Benefits of MindTap Math Foundations

Tracking student progress

The student landing page has a modern feel that students can relate to and it beautifully encapsulates their Math past, present and future. The left side has Read More…


Teaching Strategies: Students with Learning Disabilities

By now, you know that all students are unique and have their own learning preferences and strengths. You can adapt your teaching strategies to meet these needs, including the needs of students with learning disabilities. It’s vital for all instructors to become familiar with the types of learning disabilities in order to help facilitate a positive learning experience. Try these tips for expanding your teaching methods to be inclusive of all learning types.

Approach each student as an individual

Students with learning disabilities are the largest group of students with disabilities. Some of the many disabilities include difficulty in writing or reading, Read More…


Tips for Students: When Your Final Grade Depends on Group Work

Working in a group is a challenge, sometimes, whether you are a college student or an adult in the workforce. Not to put even more pressure on you, but what if your final grade depends on that group work? You can handle it and even do well if you use these tips for working on a group project.

Why group work?

If your instructor has assigned a group project, most likely it is because they want to reinforce communication and collaboration—both are valuable skills for college students to take out into the real world. But what if your fellow students Read More…


Executive News in Higher Ed Newsletter: March 2017

Skills-Based Credentials More Important Than Ever
4 out of every 10 students who enroll in a four-year degree drop out before graduation, often leaving with nothing to show but debt. Is skills-related education the solution?     Wanted: Factory Workers, Degree Required
Today’s workforce demands more skills than a high school education, but less than a bachelor’s degree. Find out how employers are working with community colleges to minimize these gaps.   Why Use an Instructional Designer?
Explore the course development process and how IDs identify learning outcomes, select corresponding content, and optimize comprehension by removing obstacles to learning.   The New Read More…


Former U.S. Representative Weighs in on Retention

The significance of student retention in higher education extends beyond the institutions themselves. In addition to personal and professional growth, empowered learners build stronger communities and improved outcomes for all. In fact, some policymakers have dedicated their careers to supporting strategies that serve students more effectively. According to George Miller, former chair of the House Education and Workforce Committee, retention is about success and ensuring students are positioned to thrive from day one.

Dedicated to Expanding Educational Access

Throughout his 40-year career as member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Miller drafted many pieces of landmark legislation to advance Read More…


Teach Your College Students to Read Critically

Although it can be a challenge to convince college students to complete their reading assignments, just reading them isn’t enough. To really get the benefit of reading, students need to employ critical thinking skills. We cannot expect that all of our students possess these skills and know how and when to use them. Reading requires skills that have to be learned, and college-level reading requires additional skills to create student success. Here are some teaching tips to help your college students improve their critical thinking skills.

Reading textbooks

What exactly is reading, and what does it mean to read a Read More…


Tips for Students: Top Study Habits

For every college student that has established good study habits, there is another who needs help with how to study in college. We’ve compiled some study strategies that should assist you in achieving your goals and objectives, no matter the course.

Assessing your study habits

A key area for any college student in the quest to obtain good study habits is time management and motivation. If these are areas that you struggle in, they should be at the top of your goals and objectives list to tackle. After all, how to study in college really begins with the understanding of Read More…


Instructional Design 101 Part 6: Instructional Designer/Faculty Partnership

In previous posts in our Instructional Design 101 series, we’ve talked about what an instructional designer is and isn’t. An ID is not a subject matter expert or a faculty member. An ID is an expert in learning theory who can collaborate with your school’s faculty, consulting with subject matter experts along the way, to help ensure that students walk away from a course with a specific set of knowledge and skills. In this post, we’ll take a look at how the partnership between Cengage’s IDs and your school’s faculty works.

The ID’s role

In Part 5 of this series, Read More…


Re-Energize Your Online Discussions Mid-Semester

One of the biggest challenges in e-learning is keeping up motivation throughout the course. For many college students, enthusiasm for classes may wane mid-semester; online students, who lack the face to face feedback to reinforce their motivation, may experience this even more strongly than their on-campus peers. To re-energize your online discussion, think about the kinds of discussion questions that will not only engage your students in the course material, but also help them relate and apply the material beyond the classroom.

Motivation and instructors

“Your instructors will typically be an excellent source of motivation,” Ryan Watkins and Michael Corry advised Read More…