tips for students

Keeping Your Computer Secure

Whether you’re teaching an online or on-ground course, your computer is an indispensable part of your and your students’ everyday lives. Losing the information you’ve stored there is a significant blow to your ability to perform successfully. Begin considering the loss of privacy, security, intellectual property, money, and other data that takes place via hacking, phishing, and other forms of identity theft — as well as the damage done to computers by malware, hackers, and other forms of cyberattack — and you’ll undoubtedly recognize the importance of keeping your computer as safe and secure as can be. To this Read More…


Tips for Students: Participating Effectively in Discussions

At best, discussions can prove enlightening, engaging, and productive for all involved. At worst? We’re sure you have your own adjectives! Though you, as the instructor, generally play a role in moderating the discussions that take place in your class, your students bear the onus of participating in the discussion with respect, responsiveness, and responsibility. Given that your students may not come to your class knowing how to conduct a productive discussion, they may appreciate learning some of its basic elements. Cindy Griffin and Jennifer Emerling Bone’s text Invitation to Human Communication stress that, in order to be an Read More…


Creating a Schedule for Yourself

If you’d like to begin the new year with confidence and a goal-oriented mindset, the act of creating a schedule can help you in that direction. When created purposefully, a schedule can be a tool that frees you to place a priority on the matters of greatest importance to you. In their book How to Study in CollegeEleventh Edition, Walter Pauk and Ross J.Q. Owens state that “…following a schedule soon becomes a source of strength and a boon to your life” (p. 44). In other words, a schedule helps you exercise greater control over your time and your attitude, which leads Read More…


Students: Map Out Your Progress

Think back on your undergraduate education. Perhaps you were especially driven and began college with the end in mind, and charted your course from matriculation to graduation as quickly as you could. On the other hand, the trajectory of your undergraduate years may look more like a winding path through the forest than a straight shot from Point A to Point B. Today’s learners are likely not much different: some are more decisive, while others tend to keep things more-open ended until a decision must be made. In your role as an educator, many of your students may seek you Read More…


For Your Students: How to be an Effective Note Taker

Even as we edge toward the end of the term, it’s not too late for students to hone their study skills. This article from a previous eNewsletter on “Active Learning” offers students some tips for taking effective notes in your course — notes that will later prove handy as they study for their final exams. Note-taking can keep students engaged because they are, in essence, disciplining themselves to listen closely to what is being said. What else do you do to encourage active engagement during a lecture? Please share your thoughts in the comments section or send them to us via Read More…


Tips for Students: Healthy Finals Week Study Tips

Though Thanksgiving offers most of us an opportunity to reflect and rest, students (and instructors) know that finals week is just around the corner. The good news: by preparing now, students can eliminate some of the pressure and stress they’d face if they leave it all to the last minute. Throughout the year, our colleagues at Questia share tools, tips, and resources that inspire more effective research and study habits. In light of the time of year, we wanted to share this helpful post from the Questia blog, which offers students some suggestions for staying healthier and better organized through Read More…


Tips for Student Success in an Online Course

Online learning may appeal to students for any number of reasons: the convenience of anytime, anywhere learning; the flexible and self-paced nature of many courses; and the asynchronous type of discussions that allow more time to reflect on an instructor or classmate’s question before responding. Though the appeal itself may be immediate, students may still need guidance toward making the most of the opportunities that an online course affords them. In FOCUS on College Success, Third Edition, Constance Staley describes the key behaviors that will help them thrive in the online learning environment. Though these eight strategies Read More…


For Students: How to Make the Most of Group Work

Bad experiences with uncommitted teammates, conflict, and a lack of clear direction have led some students to view “group work” as a dirty term. However, it may be that these students simply haven’t been introduced to the steps involved in becoming an effective group. Thus, before you assign a group project, it may help to provide your class with guidelines that will lead them to success — rather than frustration or discord. What actions and behaviors lead to a successful group experience? In McKeachie’s Teaching Tips, Svinicki and McKeachie offer students the following suggestions: Make sure that all Read More…


Reinforcing Productive Time Habits

We all have a list of things we need to accomplish — and often, it seems that they all need to be done at the same time. Unfortunately, no one’s ever figured out how to add more hours to the day — but we can certainly find better ways to manage the twenty-four hours we do have. How can you start building positive, productive habits that lead to more effective use of your time? Walter Pauk and Ross J. Q. Owens’ How to Study in College offers some suggestions that both you and your students can use to ensure you’re Read More…


Putting Off Procrastination

We know the importance of time management. We’re also familiar with the feeling of joy (or relief) that comes after finishing a daunting task. However, despite our best intentions, we’re often all too willing to put off what needs to be done. In How to Study in College, Walter Pauk and Ross J. Q. Owens offer suggestions for fighting off procrastination. Share these tips with your students who may find themselves habitually working on assignments until the last minute, or refer to them when you find yourself staring at a looming deadline.  

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