gamification

Improve Student Confidence and Engagement with Gamification

Guest Contributor: Carlos Diaz, The American School, Vietnam It is the cold truth: a video game will catch your students’ attention more than the elaborate, cool plan you stayed up all night preparing for. For some instructors, this may be a sad truth. For others, this is simply the way society is evolving. But hopefully, you can see this as an opportunity. You can use games in your classrooms to boost engagement, confidence and learning. More and more students are responding positively to what is known as Game Based Learning (GBL): teaching strategies using games or gamification to find a better Read More…


Level Up Teaching Strategies with Gamification in the Classroom

I’m a perfect target for marketing driven by gamification, as evidenced by the amount of money I spend at Starbucks; by the point-earning search engine I use on my computer; and by the fitness trackers and tied-in apps I can use to earn points across platforms, competing with friends on various leaderboards on a daily basis. College students, who were likely raised with video games as an everyday part of life, are even more receptive to being engaged in this manner. To tap into this growing, but still experimental, strategy, many teachers are using gamification in the classroom, allowing Read More…


Applying Gamification to Education

For the past several years, the category of “Game-Based Learning” has appeared in the New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Report: Higher Education Edition, classified as a set of trends to watch in the two-to-three year horizon. In the 2013 edition of this report, the category was renamed to be “Games and Gamification.” Several weeks ago, this blog featured a number of posts on the use of games in education, clearly a hot topic, as evidenced by the number of readers who have accessed these articles since the original post dates. As the Horizon Report points out, games and gamification are not Read More…


Playing to Learn: Tales from the Trenches

Guest Contributor: Jeannie Novak, Lead Author & Series Editor, Game Development Essentials. In 2003, while speaking at the University of Southern California’s Teaching, Learning & Technology conference, I noticed more than a few visibly uncomfortable educators in the audience. I had recently completed my Master’s thesis on using massively multiplayer online games (MMOs) as online distance learning applications, and I was providing a summary of my findings. The notion of any game posing as a learning management system (LMS) was difficult enough for most to parse—especially at the time—but those who weren’t well versed in the workings of Read More…