Humanities

Part Four: Bring Digital Humanities to Your Classroom

Digital humanities—a phrase that’s been floating around academic blogs, conferences and publications for at least the last decade, if not longer. But incorporating digital into our classrooms to benefit our students can be tricky. Technology at times fails to work during key moments of a class—or the new digital platform that promises better learning outcomes just leads to frustration and confusion for instructors and students. However, as many of our study fields date back to before the advent of the printing press, we’re uniquely positioned to show our students the value of technologies while likewise modeling when a Read More…


Part Three: Teach Your Humanities Students to Communicate through Reading and Writing

Among the skills many college graduates are seen to lack when they enter the workforce after graduation, writing proficiency tops the list. As a First-Year writing instructor, teaching critical reading and writing is, of course, my main objective. Yet this instruction shouldn’t end for students after they’ve completed their foundational writing courses. Instructors at all levels, and in all disciplines, should reinforce and build upon this—particularly in the humanities as developing strong writers and thoughtful readers are where we can shine. Here are some quick activities you can incorporate into your courses now to help your students: Build Read More…


Part Two: Can We Teach our Students How to Teach Themselves Critical Thinking?

Before the start of term this fall, I sat through two days of professional development with colleagues from a variety of disciplines. When the facilitator asked us what we wanted our students to be able to do after leaving our classes, one phrase that came up again and again was critical thinking—we want our students to leave our classes with stronger critical thinking skills than they came in with. The facilitator pushed back, asking us what we meant by that and what it looked like in our classrooms. There was a collective pause in the room. Lots of Read More…


Part One: Why the Humanities Matter in Higher Education

Elizabeth Martin is an Instructional Specialist in the Writing Studies Department at Montclair State University in New Jersey and a staff writer for American Mircoreviews & Interviews. She received her M.F.A. from William Paterson University. Her journalism has appeared in Parsippany Life, Neighbor News and The Suburban Trends. Her creative writing has been published by Neworld Review, Hot Metal Bridge and Menacing Hedge, among others. She’s the recipient of two New Jersey Press Association awards. Currently, she’s at work on a collection of essays. Near the start of every fall semester, I cancel classes for a week to have Read More…