student success

Exploring Different Generations

How do you make learning relevant and engaging for the learners in your classroom? Do you give certain examples that you find most of your students can relate to? Please share your feedback and comments below. In this podcast from the TeamUP Professional Online Development Portal, TeamUP Faculty Programs Consultant Damon Givehand interviews his colleague and fellow TeamUP Consultant Bridgett McGowen-Hawkins about her experience teaching different generations in the same classroom. Bridgett reflects on what she observed, learned, and acted on from that experience. She also discusses feeling prepared to make learning relevant, interesting, and engaging for everyone Read More…


Workforce Education Initiatives that Reach Non-Traditional Students

Guest Contributor David Garza, Vice President, Careers and Computing, Cengage Learning The definition of non-traditional students is varied and can include individuals with a variety of demographic characteristics ranging from age and gender to ethnicity and income. For this discussion let’s focus on a sub-set that has a common interest related to the “why” they are enrolled in higher education. The “why” is to gain employment in a job that earns a family sustainable wage. Who are these “non-traditional” students? They are low-skilled working adults, veterans, military spouses, low-income young adults, displaced workers and single parents. This cohort has very different Read More…


Reaching the “ME” Generation

Guest Contributor: Dr. Jonathan Duchac, Merrill Lynch Professor of Accounting, Wake Forest University

What do you do to connect with a new generation of students? Below, Dr. Jon Duchac, accounting professor and author, writes about the “ME” Generation — what makes them unique, and how you can reach them. 

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Students: Map Out Your Progress

Think back on your undergraduate education. Perhaps you were especially driven and began college with the end in mind, and charted your course from matriculation to graduation as quickly as you could. On the other hand, the trajectory of your undergraduate years may look more like a winding path through the forest than a straight shot from Point A to Point B. Today’s learners are likely not much different: some are more decisive, while others tend to keep things more-open ended until a decision must be made. In your role as an educator, many of your students may seek you Read More…


What Activities Work to Achieve Learning? Merrill’s First Principles

It’s likely that you encourage learners in your classroom to connect the material you’re covering to examples from their own lives. How do you then take it a step further and get them to think critically and apply what you’ve taught them to solve a problem? Leave your thoughts and ideas in the comments section below. Guest Contributor: Erin Doppke, Senior Instructional Designer, Cengage Learning Custom Solutions As you approach your courses for next semester, consider incorporating an instructional model on which many instructional designers rely: Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction (Merrill, 2002). Instructional designers think of Merrill’s First Read More…


Optimizing Learning Activities for Student-Centered Learning

As you approach the beginning of a new year, and likely the start of a new term, we’d like to revisit an article from an early edition of the Cengage Learning eNewsletter that addresses some best practices that you can keep in mind as you think about creating student-centered activities. Do you have a “success story” about how you have re-shaped assignments so that they are more student centered? Share it in the comments section below! Guest Contributor Jason Lancaster, M.Ed. Regardless of the model you use, designing a meaningful educational program requires careful analysis, thoughtful development, and thorough assessment. Here, Read More…


Learning Preferences of Today’s Students

Learners in your classes will soon be making decisions about purchasing course materials for a new term. Below, we’ve republished results from a recent survey about students’ format preferences when it comes to educational reading. Take a look to catch a glimpse of how students’ learning preferences have shifted.  Recently, Cengage Learning’s 4LTR Press team conducted a survey among students, asking their preferences for print or digital resources in the educational context. Review the results for a quick snapshot of what they’re thinking. You may find the trends interesting! What are your reflections on the Read More…


Learning Styles: A Response

An early issue of the Cengage Learning eNewsletter was devoted to the topic of “Addressing Different Learning Styles.” This issue prompted some feedback from instructors with opposing viewpoints on the matter of basing one’s teaching style on this idea. Below, Dr. Melanie Cooper, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Education at Clemson University, provides her response. We welcome thoughtful, academic dialogue around all the topics we discuss at our blog. If you have any feedback, please feel free to submit it via the Comments section below. Guest Contributor: Melanie M Cooper, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Clemson University (Clemson, SC) The Cengage Learning Read More…


Tips for Student Success in an Online Course

Online learning may appeal to students for any number of reasons: the convenience of anytime, anywhere learning; the flexible and self-paced nature of many courses; and the asynchronous type of discussions that allow more time to reflect on an instructor or classmate’s question before responding. Though the appeal itself may be immediate, students may still need guidance toward making the most of the opportunities that an online course affords them. In FOCUS on College Success, Third Edition, Constance Staley describes the key behaviors that will help them thrive in the online learning environment. Though these eight strategies Read More…


Reinforcing Productive Time Habits

We all have a list of things we need to accomplish — and often, it seems that they all need to be done at the same time. Unfortunately, no one’s ever figured out how to add more hours to the day — but we can certainly find better ways to manage the twenty-four hours we do have. How can you start building positive, productive habits that lead to more effective use of your time? Walter Pauk and Ross J. Q. Owens’ How to Study in College offers some suggestions that both you and your students can use to ensure you’re Read More…